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    Archived pages: 24 . Archive date: 2013-09.

  • Title: SITE - 33.2013 Senses
    Descriptive info: .. Home.. Issues.. About.. 33.. 2013 Senses.. Any definition of the aesthetic domain poses a challenge to thought: should aesthetics limit itself to the fine arts, and perhaps only to works that attain a particular and paradigmatic status, or should it aspire to formulate a general theory of what may count as an object of aesthetic appreciation, including everyday life and all aspects of our world that pertain to the senses? When the term aesthetics was coined in the first half of the eighteenth century, it was from the outset a multidimensional term, beset with tensions and conflicts — on the one hand a theory of the fine arts, which would coalesce into a “system” a few decades later; on the other hand, as was claimed by Baumgarten, who invented the term, an “art of thinking beautifully.. ” Aesthetics was partly a theory of a new class of objects, but more generally also a profound upheaval of rationalist philosophy that took its cues from a re-evaluation of the sensible.. From the moment of its emergence, aesthetics has oscillated between a subordinate position in the philosophical encyclopedia and a claim to explore the dimension of sense as such, beyond all particular disciplinary demarcations.. The first section explores this question in the past and present, beginning with an interview with Jacques Rancière, whose Aisthesis: Scenes from the Aesthetic Regime of Art constitutes one of the most significant attempts in recent times to chart the emergence of a new distribution of the sensible from the eighteenth century onward.. Continuing with essays that address crucial moments in the first phases of aesthetics — Baumgarten, who is currently being re-read as providing a general theory of sensibility (Sven-Olov Wallenstein), Lessing, who gives aesthetic pleasure a particular twist by connecting it to a dimension of pain (Cecilia Sjöhom), and the later intertwining of aesthetics and fashion (Sara Danius) — the section proceeds to discussions of modern artistic forms: the role of law and guilt in Kafka (Howard Caygill), the question of filmic illusion (Gertrud Koch), and the problem of whether art, and particularly the visual arts, can be understood at all on the basis of a generalized aesthetic (Morten Kyndrup).. The status of a phenomenology of the sensible is at the center of the last three contributions, Pablo Bustinduy Amador’s essay on painting, Marcia Sá Cavalcante Schuback’s meditation on drawing, and finally Susan Kozel’s interrogation of the challenge put to a phenomenology of dance  ...   Staffan Lundgren provides a critical take on the ideologies of parametric design.. • The Editors.. 28.. 2009.. The recent death of Merce Cunningham (1919–2009) deprives us of yet another major artist, whose….. 26-27.. The philosophical journey begun in Edmund Husserl’s (1859–1938) quest for a phenomenological….. 25.. The publication of Jacques Derrida’s seminar from 2001–2002, La bête et le souverain, will no….. 24.. 2008.. Residual spaces always seem to be invested with a romantic and disruptive energy: as flipsides of….. 22-23.. Sometime in the shift between the 1960s and the 1970s the notion of the institution, in both the….. 21.. 2007.. The young Marx follows Hegel’s lectures in Berlin, and learns to apply his ideas to the concrete….. 20.. Site is a journal for contemporary art, architecture, cinema, and philosophy.. When the journal….. 18-19.. Press Play to Begin: At some point during the evening of June 20th 1972 a conversation between two….. 16-17.. 2006.. In Comments on the Society of Spectacle, published in 1988, Guy Debord wrote about the fusion of….. 15.. 2005.. At the heart of Berlin Mitte the former East German ‘Palace of the People’s Republic’ stands….. 13-14.. Claire Doherty’s introduction to the recently released Contemporary Art: from Studio to Situation….. 12.. 2004.. In Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn's (1606–1669) The Anatomy Lesson of Dr.. Tulp, dated 1632, we….. 11.. The integration through radio of mobile ground and air forces constituted the completion of the….. 9-10.. The Norwegian artist Børre Sæthre has a series of outstanding exhibitions behind him, and has….. 7-8.. In 1967, Ed Ruscha hired a pilot and a photographer to make images of what is arguably the most….. 6.. 2003.. Cairo: Capital of Egypt, largest city not just in Africa, but also in the Arab World, with an….. 5.. After the war, the home acquired a central role in the reconstruction of society.. During the years….. 3-4.. 2002.. During the last decade, cinema – and not just photography and video – has come to play a….. 2.. The following texts all deal with the French research collective, CERFI, which, from the….. 1.. 2001.. The concept of SITE indicates a kind of indeterminacy, which perhaps is what characterizes the….. Publisher and Editor in Chief.. Sven-Olov Wallenstein.. Editors.. Brian Manning Delaney, Power Ekroth, Jeff Kinkle, Trond Lundemo, Staffan Lundgren, Karl Lydén, Helena Mattsson, Meike Schalk, Susan Schuppli, Kim West.. Contact.. info@sitemagazine.. net.. Graphic Design.. Konst & teknik.. Submissions.. Text proposals to be sent to info@sitemagazine.. © 2013..

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  • Title: SITE - Issues
    Descriptive info: The recent death of Merce Cunningham (1919–2009) deprives us of yet another major artist, whose work straddled the divide between the legacy of modernism and the emergence of something new, for which the….. The philosophical journey begun in Edmund Husserl’s (1859–1938) quest for a phenomenological origin of the sciences, of our experience of ourselves, and of the world, is still underway.. His 150th….. The publication of Jacques Derrida’s seminar from 2001–2002, La bête et le souverain, will no doubt initiate a new phase in the reception of the philosopher’s work.. These seminars, from the first one….. Residual spaces always seem to be invested with a romantic and disruptive energy: as flipsides of modernity, crevices opened up in the apparently seemless narrative of technological progress, they radiate a….. Sometime in the shift between the 1960s and the 1970s the notion of the institution, in both the narrow and broad senses of the term, underwent profound mutations, from the university to the museum and….. The young Marx follows Hegel’s lectures in Berlin, and learns to apply his ideas to the concrete surrounding world: there is no more free will, since man’s consciousness is determined by his social….. When the journal began six years ago, we attempted to set ourselves a series of goals, or at least to circumscribe a certain….. Press Play to Begin: At some point during the evening of June 20th 1972 a conversation between two men was secretly taped on a SONY TC-800B reel-to-reel voice recorder: an innocuous machine that uses 0..  ...   mobile ground and air forces constituted the completion of the conceptual development of military strategy in the open fields of high-intensity combat.. Despite the completion….. The Norwegian artist Børre Sæthre has a series of outstanding exhibitions behind him, and has embarked on an international career.. Quite often the installations, or structures, are spectacular, and they are….. In 1967, Ed Ruscha hired a pilot and a photographer to make images of what is arguably the most banal urban location.. From a mile up, Ruscha dwarfed Los Angeles, recording a vision of the car-infested….. Cairo: Capital of Egypt, largest city not just in Africa, but also in the Arab World, with an estimated population of around 16–22 million (though presumably considerably higher) – a significant chunk of….. During the years of war, many men had left the family for military service, and their work had been done by women.. To reinstate….. During the last decade, cinema – and not just photography and video – has come to play a decisive role in art.. In addition to being just one more idiom added to the already highly stratified and complex….. The following texts all deal with the French research collective, CERFI, which, from the mid-sixties to the end of the seventies, developed a new way of questioning urban space and the function of the….. The concept of SITE indicates a kind of indeterminacy, which perhaps is what characterizes the contemporary moment more than anything else – an indeterminacy concerning the relations among the arts and their…..

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  • Title: SITE - About
    Descriptive info: Sven-Olov Wallenstein.. Konst teknik.. net.. SITE.. Box 19009.. 104 32 Stockholm.. Sweden..

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  • Title: SITE - 28.2009
    Descriptive info: The Contagious Documentary.. The recent death of Merce Cunningham (1919–2009) deprives us of yet another major artist, whose work straddled the divide between the legacy of modernism and the emergence of something new, for which the word “postmodern” has imposed itself.. Reworking the vocabulary of traditional ballet into a language of movement and space that discarded inherited ideas of psychology and narration, Cunningham explored, often together with John Cage, the possibilities of chance and aleatory combinations of music, movement, and images.. In her obituary, Camilla Damkjaer poses the question whether dance, or even art in general, can approach that which simply is, beyond representation, which for Cunningham became the question of.. movement.. — and whether movement itself can become a way of thinking.. The “postmodern” has a highly diverse geneaology, although the reference to the work of Jean-François Lyotard seems inevitable.. Thirty years ago, in 1979, his.. La condition postmoderne.. triggered a debate that has remained confusing and inconclusive up to the present.. Re-reading this book today, Sven-Olov Wallenstein argues in his essay, should mean to acknowledge the stratifications of his oeuvre, above all the extent to which modernist art — and precisely the question that haunted Cunningham: how we can approach that which is, and touches us before representation — remained his overarching theme.. An alternative to the divide between the modern and postmodern has recently been proposed by Nicolas Bourriaud.. In an interview with Fredrik Svensk, he discusses his recent book, The Radicant, the need to approach globalization from an aesthetic point of view, and to develop new forms of resistance within the current mode of production and circulation of commodities.. Sinziana Ravini reviews a recent exhibition, “The Space on the Side of the Road”, at Röda Sten in Gothenburg, which takes its point of departure in the “Right to Roam”, a law guaranteeing public access to certain publicly or privately owned spaces.. Locating an attempt to transgress the limit between socially engaged art and a romantic tradition based in nature, Ravini looks into the idea of  ...   a film that stretches the definition of photographic representation.. Not only capturing the catastrophe of Chernobyl by showing us aerial views of the city, but itself imprinted with visual traces of radiation and contaminated by lethal radioactivity, the film renders representation and event inseparable.. Jakob Nilsson discusses the French banker Albert Kahn’s vertiginous project Les Archives de la planète, whose aim was to document the world of the early 20th century.. His essay highlights a film recorded in Ethiopia, and addresses the representation of a country that did not fit the colonial picture, first and foremost by being the only political actor to successfully resist European colonization in the first Italo-Ethiopian war of 1895–96.. Nilsson’s essay thus underscores the ambivalence of universalization at a time of colonial transition, and how Kahn’s project, while depending on the colonial ethnographic discourses of the time, also offers a possibility to break with them.. By recounting certain conditions of the Eichmann Trial in Jerusalem 1961, Rebecka Thor demonstrates how Eyal Sivan’s film.. The Specialist.. produces a breach in the representation of the Holocaust.. She investigates how the trial and its documentation — an obsolete kind of videotaping, disseminated for daily broadcasting around the world — played a major role in creating a Holocaust narrative based on the testimonies of survivors.. The Editors.. In Memory of Merce.. By Camilla Damkjaer.. The Postmodern Condition.. By Sven-Olov Wallenstein.. Radicals and Radicants.. An Interview with Nicolas Bourriaud.. By Fredrik Svensk.. The Last Temptations of Socio-Romanticism.. By Sinziana Ravini.. Site Poster: Spotted Women 2:2.. By Loulou Cherinet.. The Art of Documentary Narratives.. By Karl Lydén.. William E.. Jones: Time and Documentary Effect.. By Luigi Fassi.. Soviet Defectors: Reading Radiological Film.. By Susan Schuppli.. The Ambivalence of Universalization in Albert Kahn‘s Archive of the Planet.. By Jakob Nilsson.. The Eichmann Trial as Film and Narrative.. By Rebecka Thor.. 2009 The Contagious Documentary.. 2009 Venetian Views.. 2009 Derrida s Last Paths.. 2008 Residuals.. 2008 Spaces of Art.. 2007 Authentic Histories.. 2007 Reinventing Site.. 2007.. 2006.. 2005.. 2004.. 2003.. 2002.. 2001..

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  • Title: SITE - 26-27.2009
    Descriptive info: Venetian Views.. His 150th anniversary might be taken as an op-portunity to pause and reflect upon the divided trajectories that have characterized the philosophical geography of the last century: the split between analytic and Continental thought, but also the interior rifts and conflicts that have come to mark the latter, this nebulous entity known as “Continental philosophy”.. It is often said that phenomenology, especially in its post-Husserlian variants, has a certain affinity with aesthetic experience, and that the concept of sense that it wielded from the very outset made it more permeable to questions that lay outside the sphere of the sciences.. While this is less true of Husserl himself, the development that had begun in Heidegger and was continued in Gadamer and various French followers in many ways warrants this description.. But what then of Husserl himself? In a dense and even enigmatic letter to the poet Hugo von Hofmannsthal, written in 1907, when Husserl felt he had just discovered the essential outlines of his own method, he suggested a close proximity between the intuitive procedure of a pure phenomenology and a pure art, and his reflections on phantasy and image consciousness in fact draw him close to certain developments in early modern art.. Other related aspects of Husserl’s phenomenology would intrigue later readers, not the least of which was his profound analysis of temporality, which is at the core of Nicholas Smith’s essay.. Drawing on, but also rectifying, Derrida’s influential analysis in the light of recently published manuscripts, Smith shows the centrality of time in Husserl’s thought, and why he is, and will re-main, “contemporary” in all senses of the word.. A crucial art-critical debate that erupted in the late 1960s concerned precisely the question of time, and the reference to phenomenology played a highly ambiguous role: minimal art, Michael Fried argued, introduces a temporal flow in the experience of art objects, which makes their “presentness” degrade into the everyday time of “presence” and dismantles their autonomy.. Reversing the argument proposed by Fried, Bert Vandenbussche’s essay picks up this thread in an essay that scrutinizes the work of Jeff Wall and David Claerbout, and reads the relationship between audience and work as a dynamic game of identification and alienation, or a “continuous negotiation”..  ...   anxiety in modernity, so that they could be affirmed as the new cultural form of the Metropolis.. Tafuri’s work spans architectural history from the Renaissance to the 1980s, and any interpretation of modern architecture that ignores him undoubtedly condemns itself to irrelevance.. And yet his legacy is a contested one: does the kind of critical theory he proposed in fact block our per-ception of the present, should it be respectfully laid to rest in the archives, or is there a need to re-think —.. with, through, against.. him —the task of critical theory?.. For Rixt Hoekstra, we must separate the pro-gram of research initiated by Tafuri from the context of 1960s and ’70s Italian politics – and it is clear that thequestion of the ideological role played by architecture and the negative logic of the “Metropolis” is very much alive today, as can be seen in the writings and projects of someone like Rem Koolhaas.. Pier Vittorio Aureli’s essay addresses the historical context as well, but it does so in order to show that the thesis of a “death of architecture” often ascribed to Tafuri appears rather different when seen in the light of his analysis of “intellectual work”.. Andrew Leach, finally, asks the question of the historian’s own practice, and of how we today should approach the divide between the “critical” andthe “operative”, especially in view of Tafuri’s sustainedreflection on the tools of historiography itself, and suggests that this is what constitutes the most productive as well as the most problematic part in his legacy.. Letter to Hofmannsthal.. By Edmund Husserl.. Phenomenology and the Possibility of a Pure Art: Husserl’s Letter to Hofmannsthal.. … (why Husserl) … (why Husserl is more contemporary than time itself) … (time itself) ….. By Nicholas Smith.. On Viewing: The Continuous Negotiation Between Image and Viewer in the Works of David Claerbout and Jeff Wall.. By Bert Vandenbussche.. Site Project: Twentieth Century Legacy.. By Carl Michael von Hausswolff.. Robert Smithson and the Importance of a Sovereign Criticism.. By Lars-Erik Hjertström Lappalainen.. Architecture, Critique, Ideology.. (S)Talking Tafuri: Tafuri anno 2009.. By Rixt Hoekstra.. Intellectual Work and Capitalist Development: Origins and Context of Manfredo Tafuri’s Critique of Architectural Ideology.. By Pier Vittorio Aureli.. The Task of Architectural History, Today.. By Andrew Leach..

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  • Title: SITE - 25.2009
    Descriptive info: Derrida s Last Paths.. The publication of Jacques Derrida’s seminar from 2001–2002,.. La bête et le souverain.. , will no doubt initiate a new phase in the reception of the philosopher’s work.. These seminars, from the first one given at the Sorbonne in 1960, to the last one at the École des Hautes Études in 2002–2003, will fill 44 volumes, and the publication effort will probably take us into the second half of this century.. This issue of site is dedicated to the memory of Jacques Derrida, and attempts to look at his work from the vantage point of its final phase.. In fact, as early as the mid-1970s Derrida’s work started to address questions of ethics and politics, the nature of philosophical teaching, the problem of human and animal life, philosophy’s relation to religion, and many other issues that would seem to transcend the initial program of deconstruction.. Whether this amounts to a turn in his work has been much debated; there are undoubtedly as many versions of “Derrida” as there are readers of his work.. Alexandre Costanzo’s and Sven-Olov Wallen-stein’s contributions take a closer look at the text of the seminar from 2001–2002, with respect both to the context, style, and impact of Derrida’s teaching, as well to how he here weaves together motifs from his previous work into a profound questioning of the idea of sovereignty, which leads him into a complex and critical debate not only with classical philosophy, but also with contemporary thinkers like Lacan, Deleuze, Foucault, and Agamben.. Josh Schwebel takes up the idea of event and singularity, and develops it in the context of recent discussions in performance theory.. Drawing on Peggy Phelan’s account of the “ontology of performance” as something  ...   interpretation, Jonna Bornemark discusses a possible reading of Derrida as a philosopher of religion that would steer clear of any theological credo and dogma.. Karl Lydén picks up the idea of “archive,” which Derrida develops in his reading of Freud, and applies it to our current versions of information storage, especially in the artworld.. Similar questions about the impact of technology are addressed in Staffan Lundgren’s essay, which deals with the collaborative work of Derrida and Bernard Stiegler, the “place” of politics and the idea of a “technological singularity” that would take us beyond the limits of the human.. In the final text, an interview with Swedish philosopher Fredrika Spindler, whose recently published book on Spinoza is the first volume of a trilogy, the subsequent volumes of which will deal with Nietzsche and Deleuze, we encounter an idea of philosophy as becoming and transformation, a reading of history that opposes the interpretation proposed by Heidegger, and an idea of thought as a corporeal and affective event, that may or may not contradict the phenomenological claim to capture the very presencing of thought, from Husserl and Heidegger to Derrida and beyond.. Whether these two ideas of philosophy are finally at odds with each other remains a decisive question for the future.. The Caress of the Event.. By Alexandre Costanzo.. The Beast and the Sovereign: Derrida’s Last Seminar.. Untranslatable Remnants: the Performance and its Document.. By Josh Schwebel.. Euripides’ Pharmacy: Derrida, Deconstruction and Dionysian Drug Dealing.. By Anders Lindström.. Phenomenology and the Question of Religion: Reading Martin Hägglund’s Radical Atheism.. By Jonna Bornemark.. E-flux, Derrida and the Archive.. 1993 Or Singularity was Here— the Case of Topolitics.. By Staffan Lundgren.. Rewriting the Ontology of Politics: An Interview with Fredrika Spindler..

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  • Title: SITE - 24.2008
    Descriptive info: Residuals.. Residual spaces always seem to be invested with a romantic and disruptive energy: as flipsides of modernity, crevices opened up in the apparently seemless narrative of technological progress, they radiate a virtual power of thinking differently, of a temporal fabric brushed against the grain.. From Walter Benjamin’s angelic inversion of time in the “Theses on the Philosophy of History” to Robert Smithson’s descent into the time of geology and entropy, the passion of contestation seems to have been on the side of the residual.. Art institutions have by no means refrained from exploiting and even instrumentalizing this condition, and the ubiquity of the second machine age industrial space turned exhibition space, with its strategic commodification of memory as spectacle, is a sure sign of this.. (The cycle seems to have become even shorter today: industrial ruins need not be more than a decade old to begin to shimmer with retroactive authenticity.. ).. Residuals and left-overs must of course be understood as more than spatial conditions: printed matter, footage, images, “information” in all possible senses, enter into our archives, consigned to forms of storage that necessarily alter their significance.. The essays of Thomas Elsaesser, on Ingmar Bergman, and Volker Pantenburg, on a series of recent exhibitions on “post-cinema,” both address such a shift in media infrastructure, where the death of cinema might lead to a different afterlife.. Kim West discusses the political dimension of Pedro Costa’s In Vanda’s Room, where the seemingly dilapidated areas of Fontainhas outside of Lisbon are invested with a pride and dignity of their own, whereas the essay of Daniel and Alexandre Costanzo investigates a work by Danielle Huillet and Jean-Marie Straub, Othon, where the overlay of different temporalities—the classical diction of Corneille’s text, the antique setting of Rome, and the present  ...   radically different future otherwise than through the lense of the apocalypse simply produces melancholy and acceptance, or whether it can refocus our perspective on history.. Similarly, melancholy is the topic of the recent Torino Biennale, reviewed by Sinziana Ravini, who charts the various possibilities still lodged in this age-old concept.. Claude Lévi-Strauss, who celebrated his 100th birthday on November 28, is the topic of Sven- Olov Wallenstein’s essay.. From his early melancholy reflections on the disappearance of cultural differences to his structural analyses of myth and kinship, he has done more than anyone else in this century to erase the difference between the “savage” and the “modern” mind, and to prove that the residual and the emergent are looped in a historical becoming without beginning and end, that the logos of mythos and the mythos of logos will always remain intertwined, and that the power of reason always resides in an opening to its outside—which thereby becomes an inside more profound than the simple interiority of any cogito.. The idea of the residual has finally been integrated into the fabric of site itself.. This issue has been printed on recycled paper, which means that each copy is slightly different, based on a process of random selection decided by the printer, thus affecting the very support of graphic and textual information.. Ingmar Bergman in the Museum? Thresholds, Limits, Conditions of Possibility.. By Thomas Elsaesser.. “Post Cinema?” Movies, Museums, Mutations.. By Volker Pantenburg.. Man with the Mini-DV Camera.. By Kim West.. The Possibility of a World.. By Alexandre and Daniel Costanzo.. Site Project: Untitled.. By Kader Attia.. Traces of Metal.. By Janina Pedan.. The Desire Called Apocolypse.. By Jeff Kinkle.. The 50 Moons of Saturn: the Second Torino Triennale.. The Insides and Outsides of Reason: Lévi-Strauss at 100..

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  • Title: SITE - 22-23.2008
    Descriptive info: Spaces of Art.. Sometime in the shift between the 1960s and the 1970s the notion of the institution, in both the narrow and broad senses of the term, underwent profound mutations, from the university to the museum and beyond.. The imperative of the day was to create new modes of subjectivity, which in many cases also implied a renewal, sometimes even an outright rejection, of the very idea of an institution: for wasn’t there a new freedom to be attained in that which is non-formalized and noninstitutional, in the various forms of collective agency, in the jouissance of a text that overflows the old category of the work?.. Many of these critical ideas are still with us today, although in a digested or perhaps recuperated form.. Often an object of a nostalgia—May 68 undoubtedly being one of the most fetishized items of recent history—sometimes as the ground for a denunciation of the present, they have become the backbone of a new type of official institutional discourse, where self-reflexivity and self-criticism are what provides the art institution with its very source of legitimacy.. A certain type of anti-institutional gesture has in many cases become the sole banner under which business can go on as usual.. In other cases, there is no doubt a deeply felt need to rethink institutionality, which is why ideas of the workshop, the laboratory, the open university, etc.. , in one form or another have imposed themselves as viable options, although the ultimate result of such strategies is by no means clear.. Some thirty years ago artists and theorists began to understand the physical site of art as an institutional place, defined by ideologies, discourses, and symbolical exchanges that extend into a whole network of other places (the studio, the museum, the gallery, the public space of art criticism, the art market, the private collection, etc.. ) within which the work circulates..  ...   or in a more oblique fashion.. Dan S.. Wang’s discussion of Gerald Raunig’s Art and Revolution traces the genealogy of the radical gesture, from Courbet and the Paris Commune through Situationism to the present; Kim West gives an account of the Berlin Biennial, where the idea of things that “cast no shadow” seeks to retrieve an idea of things outside of instrumentalized and institutionalized conditions; the essays by Meike Schalk, Nina Möntmann, Barbara Steiner, and Katarina Pierre, first presented at a symposium at Bildmuseet in Umeå, all address the theory and practice of museums, and ask what an open and “relational” museum could mean in the present context, also on the level of financing and politics.. From a more philosophical point of view, Sven-Olov Wallenstein discusses two recently published works of Foucault, from the beginning and end of his intellectual trajectory, which both take Kant as a departure for a questioning of modernity, and of what it means to govern and be governed; Lars-Erik Hjertström takes his cues from Deleuze in order to discuss a concept that often remains presupposed in discussions of institutional theory, namely what it means for works of art to be “criticizable”.. Finally, Karl Lydén takes a look at some recent exhibitions in New York that probe into the “unmomental” and “archive fever”—which perhaps, somewhat playfully, could be taken as two diagnoses of the current exhibitionary complex.. You Want Art? I Give You Revolution.. By Dan S.. Wang.. When Things Cast No Shadow: The Fifth Berlin Biennal for Contemporary Art.. Out Around.. By Meike Schalk.. Playing the Wild Child: Art Institutions in a Situation of Changed Public Interest.. By Nina Möntmann.. Challenging (the) Context.. By Barbara Steiner.. Site Project: Photographs.. By Martin Jacobson.. The Relational Museum.. By Katarina Pierre.. Governance and Rebellion: Focault as a Reader of Kant and the Greeks.. “Criticizability”, the New, and Experimental Criticism.. Postcards from New York..

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  • Title: SITE - 21.2007
    Descriptive info: Authentic Histories.. The young Marx follows Hegel’s lectures in Berlin, and learns to apply his ideas to the concrete surrounding world: there is no more free will, since man’s consciousness is determined by his social existence.. In 1961, the comic book Treasure Chest, published by the Catholic Guild, starts publishing a series of issues on “Godless Communism”, the first providing us with an illuminating cartoon that depicts the struggle of the young Marx.. This was particularly illuminating to J.. Edgar Hoover, who did not hesitate to write a letter thanking the editors, and stressing the need to learn from the authentic sources, in or-der to save us from such a mortal threat.. This issue gives us many such authentic histories.. Brian Manning Delaney provides a reading of the artist Lene Berg, who uses the cia as a subject matter for art, and looks into the complexities of the Cold War use of culture as a tool and a weapon.. In a review of Brian O’Doherty’s recent book,.. Studio and Cube.. , Dan Karlholm discusses how the project of institutional critique, which once gave rise to the expression “The White Cube,” stands up today.. History is indeed oblivion too, or perhaps an “active forgetting”, as Nietzsche said.. Sinziana Ravini’s essay on the artist Stefan Constantinescu probes the way in which memories of a totalitarian era are handled, and the dialectic between “proof politics” and sensationalism in an exhibition that wants to unearth Romania’s recent past.. Art history once began  ...   Deleuze’s reading of the old “Chinaman of Königsberg”, and how his Copernican Revolution overthrows not only the subject, but also the history of philosophy.. Hegel on the other hand was fascinated with history to the point of transforming the Absolute Subject into the historical process itself.. Celebrating the 200th birthday of Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit, Sven-Olov Wallenstein attempts to brush away some of the cobwebs surrounding the great spider.. In a review of Beatriz Colomina’s.. Domesticity at War.. , which looks at the psychological impact of the Cold War on American architecture, Helena Mattsson brings us back to the beginning.. And finally, Kim West’s obituary on Isidore Isou takes us back to the Letterist movement, a seemingly repressed avant-garde that was to merge into Situationism, which profoundly affected the way we read Hegel and Marx, although in a way that would probably not be appreciated by either Treasure Chest or their enthusiastic admirer at the FBI.. Limited Freedom, Unlimited Masks: Lene Berg’s ‘Gentlemen Arseholes’.. By Brian Manning Delaney.. Studio Time and Gallery Space: The Cube Reconsidered.. By Dan Karlholm.. An Archive of Pain in the Place of Oblivion.. Old Dogs, New Lights.. Site Project: This is the Sign You Have Been Waiting For, 2007.. By Bjørn-Kowalski Hansen.. Yesterday is Crowding Up My World, 2007.. Note on Deleuze and De Quincey.. Hegel and the Spirit of Phenomenology.. Transparency, Paranoia, and the Idea of Concealing in the Production of the Postwar American Home.. By Helena Mattsson.. Isidore Isou, 1925 –2007..

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  • Title: SITE - 20.2007
    Descriptive info: Reinventing Site.. When the journal began six years ago, we attempted to set ourselves a series of goals, or at least to circumscribe a certain terrain.. Because of the plurality of interests among the editors artists, curators, film theorists, architects, philosopher, art critics this proved to be a difficult if not impossible task, and instead of operating with definitions that in the end do not define anything, we attempted to do the opposite: to remain as long as possible in an indeterminate state.. This indeterminacy should however not be understood as something merely nebulous and diffuse, but as something that comes from the subject matters themselves: not only the highly porous limits between various forms of art, but also between theory and praxis, and between a heritage that seems to have lost its binding force, and a present moment that claims to have undone all hierarchies of the past.. For us, this insecurity does not mean that all aesthetic and theoretical practices would merge in some implosive synthesis, rather that they, in a reflection that starts from their specific problems, would be able to enter into a productive tension in order to produce something new and unexpected.. Unlike most academic institutions, with their divisions of labor and competence, a journal is an exemplary place for experimenting with the very form of knowledge and discourse, a place where a knowledge of the past can meet a still undetermined future, where things can remain in the making for as long as one wishes.. Whether this succeeds or not can only be decided by the reader.. From another perspective, the name site still points to a certain pervasive theme.. On the one hand the site is a point of intersection between different theories and practices, where arguments and concepts can be exchanged in a plasmatic state.. But  ...   pleasure is an integral part of any intellectual endeavor worthy of its name.. Such an undertaking no doubt implies a moment of fiction–to write or reflect on a place, to represent one’s interaction with it in any form, always means to produce an imaginary entity, perhaps to recreate the other scene, “der andere Schauplatz,” in the way that Freud once understood Rome as an analogy for the unrepresentable topographic overlay of the mind, whose temporal complexity can only be thought as a multi-layered non-temporality or a spatialized co-existence of several times.. These things are at once fictitious and real, they exist in a space where virtual pasts and futures can appear alongside each other, and which always remains under construction.. As Baudelaire wrote, a century and half ago, caught up in a historical shift in which he attempted to distinguish the moment of disappearance from the moment of emergence: “fourmillante cité, cité plein des rêves/ Ou le spectre en plein jour raccroche le passant” (“bustling city, city full of dreams/ where in plain daylight the ghost takes hold of the passer-by”).. In order to come back to the site, one first of all needs to reinvent it, turn it into its own virtual double_all of which is not an obstacle to such a project, but its unavoidable condition of possibility.. The Reign and the Glory.. The Hermit and the Plant.. By Lars-Erik Hjertström.. Lightning and Instant.. By Pasi Väliaho.. “How About a Space Force?”: An Interview with Peter Fend.. By Adina Popescu.. They’re Conspiring, Stupid.. Site Project: 100 Bent Spoons.. By Julieta Aranda.. Managing the Conflict.. By Mikkel Bolt Rasmussen.. Petrodicy: A Petropunk Dialogue.. By Reza Negarestani.. Petropolitics as Retropolitics.. By Alberto Toscano.. Architecture and the Death of Utopia.. By Claes-Magnus Bernson.. Parenthood of Form: Materiality and the Patriarchy.. By Malin Zimm.. Akerman / Godard..

    Original link path: /issues/20
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  • Title: SITE - 18-19.2007
    Descriptive info: Press Play to Begin:.. At some point during the evening of June 20th 1972 a conversation between two men was secretly taped on a SONY TC-800B reel-to-reel voice recorder: an innocuous machine that uses 0.. 5mm tape, and was set to run at the irregular speed of 15/16 IPS—or half the rate of a standard tape recorder.. In keeping with this low-fidelity recording mode, the tiny lavalier microphones that picked up this particular conversation were cheap and poorly distributed throughout the space.. The result was a tape of degraded sound quality produced under deficient recording conditions.. Fast-Forward:.. It’s 1973 and an entire nation is now magnetized by the pull of forces unspooled by this single reel of 0.. 5mm tape.. Tape 342, as it is officially referred to, is but one of a sprawling archive of approximately 3,700 hours of audio recordings taped surreptitiously by the late American Republican President Richard Nixon over a period of several  ...   the information it contains but precisely because of its absence: a gap in the tape of 18-1/2 minutes.. A residual silence which is haunted by the spectre of a man who refused to speak, who refused to fill in the gap and suture the wound that opened up the corruption of the American political system for all to see.. Excerpt from "The Case [study] of the Missing 18-½ Minutes" by Susan Schuppli.. The Case [study] of the Missing 18-½ Minutes.. Reading Reconnections.. An Archive of Less Visible Stories.. By Nina Schjønsby.. Jean-Luc Godard's Voyage(s) en utopie.. By Trond Lundemo.. Church, State, Market.. Second Thoughts.. By Andreas Gedin.. From Russia with Love.. The Man From Elsewhere.. A project by David Blandy.. Understanding Historical Events.. By Martina Reuter.. The Politics of Poetics.. In Defense of Speculative Aesthetics.. Consumption as Spatial Practice.. By Daniel Koch.. Techniques in the Age of Consumerism: Production, Desire, and the Differentiated System.. By Helena Mattson..

    Original link path: /issues/18-19
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