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    Archived pages: 94 . Archive date: 2013-08.

  • Title: Artwork by Sonja Hinrichsen
    Descriptive info: .. Skip to content.. Skip to search - Accesskey = s.. Artwork by Sonja Hinrichsen.. Posted in.. Uncategorized.. by Sonja Hinrichsen on March 9, 2011.. All images on this blog © Sonja Hinrichsen reproduction of images only with permission.. contact: sonja[at]s-hinrichsen.. net.. To view individual art projects, please click below:.. Drawings – Wall Size.. Drawings.. Upcoming Events.. Articles on Snow Drawings.. Snow Drawings, Rabbit Ears Pass, CO, Sunday Jan.. 29, 2012.. The San Francisco Bay – A Mediamorphology.. Yes,  ...   CO, January 2011.. Snow Drawings, Chatham, NY, 2011.. Citrus Grove Project.. Layered Perspectives.. Reflections.. Snow Drawings, Colorado 2009.. Artist Statement.. 5.. comments.. The Pages.. Drawings Wall Size.. The Search.. search site archives.. The Associates.. WordPress.. com.. org.. The Archives.. March 2011.. The Categories.. The Meta.. Log in.. Site Feed.. Comments Feed.. Back to top.. Blog at WordPress.. The Journalist 1.. 3 Theme.. Follow.. Follow Artwork by Sonja Hinrichsen.. Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.. Powered by WordPress..

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  • Title: Drawings – Wall Size | Artwork by Sonja Hinrichsen
    Descriptive info: ,.. Wall Size Drawings.. All of these drawings are created with archival Indian ink pens on paper.. Sizes vary, the largest wrap around a corner of a large space and are 107 inches high and 33 feet long.. All images on this blog © Sonja Hinrichsen – reproduction of images only with permission.. This slideshow requires JavaScript.. Like this:.. Like..  ...   your details below or click an icon to log in:.. Email.. (required).. (Address never made public).. Name.. Website.. You are commenting using your WordPress.. com account.. (.. Log Out.. /.. Change.. ).. You are commenting using your Twitter account.. You are commenting using your Facebook account.. Cancel.. Connecting to %s.. Notify me of follow-up comments via email.. %d.. bloggers like this:..

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  • Title: Drawings | Artwork by Sonja Hinrichsen
    Descriptive info: Sizes vary.. For larger images please click on thumbnails.. Add your thoughts here.. (optional).. Post to..

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  • Title: Upcoming Events | Artwork by Sonja Hinrichsen
    Descriptive info: THE SF BAY: A MEDIAMORPHOLOGY.. Sonja Hinrichsen Chris Treggiari.. January 6 February 11, 2012, Krowswork Gallery, Oakland.. reception January 6, 6-9pm (Oakland Art Murmur).. http://www.. krowswork.. com/mediamorphology.. html.. Art Talk at Bud Werner Library, Steamboat Springs, January 25, 2012, 6:30 pm.. steamboatlibrary.. org/events/art-talk-sonja-hinrichsen.. Art Opening group exhibition.. Snow/Crystal: Intricacy, Impermanence, and Influence.. Thursday, Jan.. 26, from 5-8 p.. m.. at.. The Depot.. , Steamboat Springs.. Community Snow Drawings in Steamboat Springs/Hayden.. Sunday, Jan.. 29.. , 11:00 am (Carpenter Ranch Hayden).. Friday, Jan.. 27.. , 11:00 am (West Lincoln Park, across the street from the library).. Saturday, Feb..

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  • Title: Articles on Snow Drawings | Artwork by Sonja Hinrichsen
    Descriptive info: My-West.. my-west.. com/painting-and-sculpture/2012/1/31/image-of-the-day-january-31-2012.. Feature on Right this Minute TV-show.. rightthisminute.. com/video/snow-circles-appear-steamboat-springs-0.. Patterns on the Land.. Steamboat Magazine, winter 2011/12, by Jennie Lay.. Steamboat Magazine-Snow Sculptures.. (pdf).. web version:.. steamboatmagazine.. com/articles/356.. php.. Rethinking Snow.. Boston Sunday Globe, March 13, 2011, by Courtney Humphries:.. Rethinking Snow-Boston Globe (pdf).. Artist transforms Ooms Pond into giant canvas.. Chatham  ...   with.. RSS.. Bennett Owen.. said, on February 1, 2012 at.. 9:32 am.. Ms.. Hinrichsen.. We have posted a short report on your snow drawings at our website, My-West.. com what an amazing and original concept, thank you so much for your efforts.. PS: Ab März geht unsere Deutsche Version von My-West Online!.. Liebe Grüße!.. Reply..

    Original link path: /patterns-on-the-land-article-steamboat-magazine-winter-201112/
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  • Title: Snow Drawings, Rabbit Ears Pass, CO, Sunday Jan. 29, 2012 | Artwork by Sonja Hinrichsen
    Original link path: /snow-drawings-rabbit-ear-pass-co-sunday-jan-29-2012/
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  • Title: Yes, you can eat them | Artwork by Sonja Hinrichsen
    Descriptive info: installation with 17 laptops (videos and text), and preserved foods, Red Deer College, Alberta, Canada, September/October 2011.. As a person who is instinctively drawn to nature and to exploring the natural world, I have been increasingly playing with the thought of contextualizing the concept “living off the land” in my artwork.. As a child, growing up in Europe, I often went out with my father hunting mushrooms and collecting wild berries in the forest.. While my love for the natural world has remained with me ever since, my knowledge about edible plants has so far been limited.. Only within the last few years have I become interested in finding out which ones of the plants that commonly grow on unattended lands are actually edible.. I generally feel like we – humans – increasingly disconnect ourselves from the natural world and tend to neglect that we are part of it and dependent on it.. While I spent a significant portion of my childhood playing outdoors – summers and winters – I rarely see children play outside today.. Our relationship to nature, which used to be uncontemplated behavior, is now being discussed on academic levels.. “Sustainability” has become a trendy term discussed by people of all scientific fields.. For me the primary question is: how can we manage to reconnect with our planet? How can we learn to live off the planet without depleting and contaminating its resources?.. Red Deer, Alberta is a small community of 92.. 000, and is surrounded by fields and forests.. During my first few days as an artist in residence with Red Deer College I explored the town’s surroundings via bike – on what seemed like a maze of bike trails through areas of forest.. While I discovered hidden lakes and beautiful river shores I wondered how and of what foods people might have sustained themselves here in the past, both Native people and those who arrived in the dawn of the town’s existence.. I started researching native plants and their uses, and was utterly surprised how many plants and their blossoms, fruits and roots are edible.. As I started collecting certain plants – primarily wild fruits I adapted my “living off the land” idea to a small town city environment, as I came to realize that a good portion of trees and scrubs planted in city parks for ornamental reasons actually bear edible fruits.. Passers-by repeatedly asked me the same questions: Why was I picking these berries? What were they called? What was I planning to do with them? Were they indeed edible? I was surprised how many people do not know what rosehips are, that crab apples are edible and that highbush cranberries can be used in place of cultivated cranberries.. To preserve the wild fruits I learnt about food preservation through jarring and drying.. I documented all my processes on video – from fruit collection to their final product.. The result of this project was shown in the college’s gallery space on five stations, each of them including two videos, samples of preserved foods and a computer with short texts about each food item and opportunity for audience interaction.. In exchange for sharing their own experiences with wild growing foods, people were offered to take the foods I had preserved.. I see this project as a beginning for a new body of work.. It is my intention to intensify this idea while spending a full growing cycle – from spring to fall – in one place – a fertile area on the countryside.. Ideally I will be living off the land entirely, without any other food sources (neither store-bought nor cultivated/grown for food purposes).. The ideal place for this has not yet been found.. (I am open to suggestions).. Since all processes will be documented on video and photo, pots, bowls and utensils used for food processing are aesthetically essential.. In Red Deer I was lucky enough to find plain cooking ware that was not overburdening the artwork.. Ideally, however, I plan to learn to create my own cooking ceramics, to ensure coherence of the work.. Consequently I hope to find a location that not only supports the “living off the land” concept, but also offers me opportunity to learn to create functional ceramic wares.. I am currently trying to find a long-term artist residency that offers ceramic facilities and is open to other artistic and conceptual fields as well.. Visitor Comments.. There was a crab apple tree right by the school I went to growing up.. Every morning during the early days of September I would walk by this tree on my way to school.. I would crab a few grab apples off the tree and eat them for my morning breakfast.. This tradition continued throughout my years in my town and whenever I would walk past that tree in the spring or summer I would grab a few apples to eat on my way.. I used to pick saskatoons and wild rubarb with my grand mother, she would make jam out of the saskatoons we gathered, (best jam I ever had) and a desert called rubarb crisp.. Though I haven’t done this in a long time.. Kinda regret not doing it more.. I cannot help but be reminded of my grandparents when I see your home made crab apple sauce- my Nana made crab apple jelly herself! I remember sneaking into their basement where she would store mounds and mounds of those goodies, my brother and I would always manage to sneak a few jar fulls home.. Thank you for the pleasant reminder.. I never thought about using crab apples as apple sauce.. I have eaten many in my life though.. It seemed like that at every house I ever lived at that there was a crab apple tree in the back yard, both in  ...   early fall my neighbor would always make jam from wild berries on an open fire in his yard.. I would sneak out of doing my chores so I could help him pick, clean, strain and boil them.. Your presentation was very nostalgic for me.. I found myself remembering all the smells, sounds and even flavours! I loved it thank you so much!.. When I was a little girl I would love to pretend that rose hips held an intense magical power.. I knew of their poison and their colour seemed dangerous as well.. I would harvest them and write magical potions calling for them as ingredients.. I feel as though you have nearly brought this to fruition as you collect and wash and mix them and then seal them in their jars.. Throughout my entire life growing up on the Sunchild Reserve, me and my family picked wild blueberries and wild strawberries… It would take hours to fill up a small bucket! Later we would mix it in with dried meat (totally dehydrated over a fire by the smoke as well as heat).. It is really good! I enjoyed watching your labour throughout your project.. Thanks.. x.. When I was young, my dad taught me all about different edible plants and berries that grew wild around our farm.. I used to get in trouble at summer camp for eating the berries I found, because everyone thought these berries were poisonous.. In our area wild strawberries grow, producing fruit the size of peas or smaller.. I have often taken the time to sit and eat them, searching carefully through the grasses to find the tiny plants.. They are an especially sweet nibble.. We never had enough to collect them for jam.. To cook them would not be right, as they are so good first hand.. We also have wild raspberries that are wonderful to snack on.. The berries are not full or large, but there is something special about picking a naturally occurring berry even if it is not as large as the domesticated plants.. I have often harvested the small crab apples in our yard.. I like to make applesauce from them as they are redder than other apples and the sauce is very pink and flavorful.. Cutting the stem off of each small apple is very tedious, so some years I don’t bother to collect them.. My mom harvests the crab apples in our backyard every fall to make jelly and juice.. She will make apple cinnamon jelly and apple mint jelly.. Most of the apples on the tree end up being bird and squirrel food.. We enjoy watching the animals pick their fair share of fruit from the tree.. It is amazing how much work goes into something like this it reminds me of a time I went with my mother-in-law to pick saskatoons and I would not stop picking.. I ended up with Three 5 gallon pails and hours and hours of work to clean and store them.. It was worth the effort.. 6 Responses.. Michael Lumb.. said, on December 19, 2011 at.. 9:41 am.. I share your feelings about wild foods and also your concern at chgildren not engaging first-hand with nature any more, it is the same in England sadly.. A great deal of the problem lies in fear of litigation sadly.. Sonja Hinrichsen.. 4:53 pm.. Hi Michael,.. great to hear from you.. Thank you for your comment.. Comments in wordpress always need to be approved by the author of the blog (me).. I think it s good that way, otherwise people could write complete rubbish on my blog without me having a way to do anything about it.. 9:42 am.. Why is my comment to be moderated is this some kind of censorship I do sincerely hope not.. Millicent Borges Accardi.. said, on December 21, 2011 at.. 8:06 pm.. Wonderful article Sonja! I remember my family used to throw out the avocados that grew in a tree in our yard since they had no idea they were edible but we eagerly ate the figs.. My husband s dad used to cruise graveyards for trees filled with olives which he would then harvest and cure.. To the embarrassment of everyone, he often brought a basket to the cemetery.. Also, I remember my dad pulling over to the side of the road on vacations through Oregon and Canada for foraging.. Many trips in the camper, we lived off the perch we caught and the greens and blackberries we found along the way.. 8:36 pm.. The underlying thesis (for me) is that as a population we have become dependent upon domesticated and breed food sources, which creates a number of problems.. Wild foods are sturdy and adaptable.. Take, for example, tomatoes.. Most commercial strains are grown for traits like thick skins (making transportation to markets easier), fewer seeds, redder color (making them cosmetically appealing); however, today s tomatoes are a tasteless lot.. I never really had a tomato until I grew my own from Heirloom seeds.. My gosh, the fresh, deep, rich flavor of sweetness and the earth.. I never canned until I moved to the canyon where the yard had pomegranate, plum and apricot trees.. My heart broke when I saw all the fruit on the ground! That first season, I ran outside and battled with the wasps for larges boxes filled with plums that I quickly figured out how to preserve.. The same thesis is true for livestock and pets.. So many purebred puppies have health issues and weaknesses that mutts don t have.. Winter Creations I GREW THIS.. said, on April 3, 2012 at.. 2:40 am.. [.. ] out she s interested in living off the land too Yes, you can eat them:.. http://sonjahinrichsen.. wordpress.. com/living-of-the-land/.. I like it.. Like this:LikeBe the first to like this [.. ]..

    Original link path: /living-of-the-land/
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  • Title: Snow Drawings, Hayden, CO, January 2011 | Artwork by Sonja Hinrichsen
    Descriptive info: These Snow Drawings were created at Carpenter Ranch near Hayden/Steamboat Springs in Northern Colorado.. Some of the drawings were on the frozen Yampa River, others on grazing lands close to the river.. To view individual images in a larger format, please click on the thumbnails below.. 8 Responses.. Claire Coté.. said, on April 19, 2011 at.. 6:00 pm.. Sonja, these are lovely! I love the aerial views.. Nice work! The connected spirals are beautiful.. Linda MacDonald.. 8:25 pm.. very beautiful!.. Suzanne Benton.. 10:27  ...   May 13, 2011 at.. 11:29 pm.. I showed your snow drawings to my students in Advanced Drawing this year.. Thanks!.. Frank Sheehan.. said, on May 23, 2011 at.. 3:21 am.. So proud of you; beautiful.. Frank.. Snow Circles by Sonja Hinrichsen | DolceSelf.. said, on February 22, 2012 at.. 11:38 pm.. ] To find out more about Sonja Hinrichsen, please click here [.. Julienne Jones.. said, on March 1, 2012 at.. 5:32 am.. brilliant work! i featured your work on my blog,.. http://thedimpledspider.. com/..

    Original link path: /snow-drawings-hayden-co-january-2010/
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  • Title: Snow Drawings, Chatham, NY, 2011 | Artwork by Sonja Hinrichsen
    Descriptive info: These Snow Drawings were created at Millay Colony for the Arts in NY, and on a small lake in the nearby town of Chatham (Ooms Conservation Area).. Local residents contributed their active help to the work on the lake..

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  • Title: Articles on Snow Drawings | Artwork by Sonja Hinrichsen
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  • Title: Snow Drawings, Rabbit Ears Pass, CO, Sunday Jan. 29, 2012 | Artwork by Sonja Hinrichsen
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    Archived pages: 94